Nuclear ventriculography

Cardiac blood pooling imaging; Heart scan - nuclear; Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography

Nuclear ventriculography is a test that uses radioactive materials called tracers to show the heart chambers. The procedure is noninvasive. The instruments DO NOT directly touch the heart.

Heart, front view

The external structures of the heart include the ventricles, atria, arteries and veins. Arteries carry blood away from the heart while veins carry blood into the heart. The vessels colored blue indicate the transport of blood with relatively low content of oxygen and high content of carbon dioxide. The vessels colored red indicate the transport of blood with relatively high content of oxygen and low content of carbon dioxide.

MUGA test

During the MUGA test, a radioactive isotope is injected into the vein. Radioactive isotopes attach to red blood cells and pass through the heart in the circulation. The isotopes can be traced through the heart using special cameras or scanners. The test is often given at rest, then repeated with exercise, or after administering certain medications. The test is performed to detect certain heart conditions.

How the Test is Performed

How to Prepare for the Test

How the Test will Feel

Why the Test is Performed

Normal Results

What Abnormal Results Mean

Risks