Tooth formation - delayed or absent

Delayed or absent tooth formation; Teeth - delayed or absent formation; Oligodontia; Anodontia; Hypodontia; Delayed dental development; Delayed tooth eruption; Late tooth eruption; Delayed dental eruption

When a person's teeth grow in, they may be delayed or not occur at all.

Tooth anatomy

The structure of the tooth includes dentin, pulp and other tissues, blood vessels and nerves imbedded in the bony jaw. Above the gum line, the tooth is protected by the hard enamel covering.

Development of baby teeth

Both baby teeth (deciduous or milk teeth) and permanent teeth have fairly well-defined times of eruption. The ages listed are the normal ages that a baby tooth emerges. Upper central incisors and upper lateral incisors erupt by 8 to 10 months. Upper canines (cuspids) erupt by 16 to 20 months. Upper first molars erupt by 15 to 21 months. Upper second molars erupt by 20 to 24 months. Lower central incisors erupt by 6 to 9 months. Lower lateral incisors erupt by 15 to 21 months. Lower canines (cuspids) erupt by 15 to 21 months. Lower first molars erupt by 15 to 21 months. Lower second molars erupt by 20 to 24 months.

Development of permanent teeth

Both baby and permanent teeth have fairly well-defined times of eruption. The ages listed are the typical ages that an adult tooth has fully emerged. Upper and lower central incisors erupt by the 7th year. Upper and lower lateral incisors erupt by the 8th year. Upper and lower canines (cuspids) erupt by 11th to 12th year. Upper and lower first premolars (bicuspids) erupt by the 9th year. Upper and lower second premolars (bicuspids) erupt by the 10th year. Upper and lower first molars erupt by the 6th year. Upper and lower second molars erupt by the 12th to 13th year. Upper and lower third molars erupt by the 17th to 25th year.

Considerations

Causes

When to Contact a Medical Professional

What to Expect at Your Office Visit