Scar revision

Keloid revision; Hypertrophic scar revision; Scar repair; Z-plasty

Scar revision is surgery to improve or reduce the appearance of scars. It also restores function, and corrects skin changes (disfigurement) caused by an injury, wound, poor healing, or previous surgery.

Keloid above the ear

Keloids are overgrowths of scar tissue that follow skin injuries. Keloids may appear after such minor trauma as ear piercing. Dark skinned individuals tend to form keloids more readily than lighter skinned individuals.

Keloid, pigmented

Keloids are overgrowths of scar tissue that follow skin injuries. Keloids may appear after such minor trauma as ear piercing. Dark-skinned individuals tend to form keloids more readily than lighter skinned individuals. These patches of keloid have become darkly pigmented.

Keloid, on the foot

A keloid is a type of exaggerated (hypertrophic) scar that usually appears following an obvious injury. Keloids may expand beyond the margin of the scar to include normal skin.

Keloid scar

Keloids are an overgrowth of scar tissue at the site of a healed skin injury. They often create a thick, puckered effect simulating a tumor. Keloids may be reduced in size by freezing (cryotherapy), external pressure, corticosteroid injections, laser treatments, radiation, or surgical removal.

Scar revision - series

Skin covers the entire body, and acts as a protective barrier. Scar tissue forms as skin heals after an injury (such as an accident) or surgery. The amount of scarring may be determined by the size, depth, and location of the wound; the age of the person; heredity; and skin characteristics including color (pigmentation). No scar can be removed completely. The degree of improvement will depend on variables such as the direction and size of the scar, the age of the person, skin type and color, and hereditary factors that may precondition the extent of the healing process.

Description

Why the Procedure is Performed

Risks

After the Procedure

Outlook (Prognosis)