Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine

Vaccines are used to boost your immune system and prevent serious, life-threatening diseases.

Vaccines

Ouch! Vaccines help to give the body immunity from infections. Different vaccines work in different ways. Some vaccines inject fragments of a virus or bacteria called antigens into the body. Once in the blood, these antigens circulate among the blood cells, which include red blood cells and white blood cells. White blood cells, such as B and T cells, help fend off foreign invaders. When antigens invade tissue, they attract macrophages. These are scavenger cells that engulf the antigens. The macrophages then signal to T-cells that the antigens are invading. Killer T cells gather and attack the antigens. Then suppressor T cells stop the attack. After the vaccination, B-cells make defensive antibodies against the antigen. These antibodies help the cells remember this particular antigen, so that they can fight it off if the body is infected again.

Immunizations

Immunizations (vaccinations) are given to initiate or augment resistance to an infectious disease. Immunizations provide a specialized form of immunity that provides long-lasting protection against specific antigens, which cause disease.

Immunizations

Immunizations (vaccinations) are given to initiate or augment resistance to an infectious disease. Immunizations provide a specialized form of immunity that provides long-lasting protection against specific antigens, such as certain diseases.

Vaccines

Vaccines are used to boost your immune system and prevent many diseases, some of which are serious or life-threatening. Vaccines “teach“ your body how to defend itself when germs, such as viruses or bacteria, invade it. After exposure to the vaccine, your immune system learns to recognize and attack the viruses or bacteria if you are exposed to them later in life. As a result, you will not become ill. Or, if you do get the illness, you will likely have a milder infection. Vaccines are very safe and very effective at protecting against certain serious diseases.

Ouch! Vaccines help to give the body immunity from infections. Different vaccines work in different ways. Some vaccines inject fragments of a virus or bacteria called antigens into the body. Once in the blood, these antigens circulate among the blood cells, which include red blood cells and white blood cells. White blood cells, such as B and T cells, help fend off foreign invaders. When antigens invade tissue, they attract macrophages. These are scavenger cells that engulf the antigens. The macrophages then signal to T-cells that the antigens are invading. Killer T cells gather and attack the antigens. Then suppressor T cells stop the attack. After the vaccination, B-cells make defensive antibodies against the antigen. These antibodies help the cells remember this particular antigen, so that they can fight it off if the body is infected again.

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