Shingles vaccine - what you need to know

All content below is taken in its entirety from the CDC Shingles Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/shingles.html

CDC review information for the Shingles VIS:

  • Page last reviewed: October 30, 2019
  • Page last updated: October 30, 2019
  • Issue date of VIS: October 30, 2019

Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the arm. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern, seen here on the arm, follows a dermatome.

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the chest. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome. The linear distribution of the nerve in the skin is very easily seen in this photograph.

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers

This is a picture of herpes zoster (shingles) on the hand and fingers. Shingles are caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Outbreaks of shingles often follow the distribution of nerves in the skin. This distribution pattern is called a dermatome.

Herpes zoster (shingles) on the back

This photograph shows clusters of blisters (vesicles) and redness (erythema) caused by herpes zoster (shingles). The pattern follows a dermatome. The area may burn or sting before the appearance of these vesicles. Early treatment with an antiviral drug (within 24 hours of the appearance of the vesicles) may prevent progression or reduce the time the infection is active (duration).

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