Food labeling

Nutrition labeling

Food labels contain a great deal of information on most packaged foods. The FDA has proposed updates to the current Nutrition Facts label.

Food Label Guide for Candy

Saturated fats are found in animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, cream, and fatty meats. They are also found in some vegetable oils -- coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils. Eating too much saturated fat is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. A diet high in saturated fat causes a soft, waxy substance called cholesterol to build up in the arteries. Too much fat also increases the risk of heart disease because of its high calorie content, which increases the chance of becoming obese (another risk factor for heart disease and some types of cancer).

Food Label Guide for Whole Wheat Bread

Whole grains, like the kind found in whole wheat bread, contain fiber and antioxidants such as Vitamin E and selenium, iron, magnesium, zinc and B vitamins. Fiber is a very beneficial nutrient that is found in whole grain products. Fiber helps to reduce the risk for some chronic diseases such as constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis. Fiber is also linked to prevent some cancers like colon cancer. Fiber may help reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes. It is also a helpful diet aid, it has no calories and helps keep you full longer.

Read food labels

Allergic reactions to a certain food can include diffuse hives, hoarse voice, wheezing, and, in severe reactions, low blood pressure and closing down of the windpipe. Medications such as antihistamines and skin creams may provide some relief from itching and rashes, but the best way to prevent future allergic reactions is to avoid the offending food in the first place. Reading the labels contained on most products is a useful way to find a certain food that a person may want to avoid.

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