Hypersensitivity vasculitis

Cutaneous small vessel vasculitis; Allergic vasculitis; Leukocytoclastic vasculitis

Hypersensitivity vasculitis is an extreme reaction to a drug, infection, or foreign substance. It leads to inflammation and damage to blood vessels, mainly in the skin. The term is not used much currently because more specific names are considered more precise.

Vasculitis on the palm

These spots of blood under the skin (purpura) are caused by vasculitis. The do not turn white with pressure (non-blanchable). In this particular case, the purpura are associated with an underlying disorder affecting the structure of the blood vessel walls (collagen-vascular disorder).

Vasculitis

Inflammation of the blood vessels (vasculitis) may be caused when antibodies that have attached to antigens in the blood (immune complexes), attach to the blood vessel walls. These purplish spots can be felt in the skin. They do not turn white (blanch) when pressed. As the condition progresses, they may become larger and more bruise-like (ecchymotic), and some may develop central ulceration or necrosis (tissue death).

Vasculitis, urticarial on the hand

These red (erythematous), hive-like (urticarial) spots (plaques) are caused by inflammation of the blood vessels (urticarial vasculitis) and do not change over a 24-hour period. The may or my not turn white (blanch) with pressure.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention