2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Coronavirus - 2019; Coronavirus - novel 2019; 2019 Novel coronavirus; SARS-CoV-2

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is mainly a respiratory illness that causes fever, coughing, and shortness of breath, but many other symptoms can occur. COVID-19 is caused by a highly infectious virus, and it has spread throughout the world. Most people get mild to moderate illness. Older adults and people with certain health conditions are at high risk for severe illness and death.

COVID-19

Infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes COVID-19, a respiratory illness that ranges from mild symptoms to pneumonia or even death. Symptoms occur within 2 to 14 days from exposure to the virus and may include fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new loss of sense of taste or smell. COVID-19 may be more severe in people who are older or who have chronic health conditions, such as heart disease or diabetes.

Coronavirus

Coronaviruses are a family of viruses. Infection with these viruses can cause mild to moderate respiratory illnesses such as the common cold. Some coronaviruses may cause severe illness and lead to pneumonia or even death.

Respiratory system

Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

Upper respiratory tract

The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that secretes mucus. The mucus traps smaller particles like pollen or smoke. Hairlike structures called cilia line the mucous membrane and move the particles trapped in the mucus out of the nose. Inhaled air is moistened, warmed, and cleansed by the tissue that lines the nasal cavity.

Lower respiratory tract

The major passages and structures of the lower respiratory tract include the windpipe (trachea) and within the lungs, the bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli. Deep in the lungs, each bronchus divides into secondary and tertiary bronchi, which continue to branch to smaller airways called the bronchioles. The bronchioles end in air sacs called the alveoli. Alveoli are bunched together into clusters to form alveolar sacs. Gas exchange occurs on the surface of each alveolus by a network of capillaries carrying blood that has come through veins from other parts of the body.

Face masks prevent the spread of COVID-19

Using face masks in public settings helps reduce the spread of COVID-19. COVID-19 spreads to people within close contact via small droplets sprayed into the air by someone with the disease who coughs, sneezes, sings, talks, or breathes. Wearing face masks or cloth face coverings helps reduce the spray of respiratory droplets from the nose and mouth. Wearing a face mask may also protect you from infection.

How to wear a face mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19

Wearing face masks or cloth face coverings helps prevent the spread of COVID-19. For masks to work, they have to be worn properly. Choose a mask with two or more layers of washable, breathable fabric that completely covers your mouth and nose and fits snugly against the sides of your face, leaving no gaps. Do not wear a mask that is too loose on the sides. Do not pull the mask low on your nose, below your nose, or below your mouth or chin. Do not leave your chin or your mouth exposed or dangle the mask from one ear. Do not wear the mask in any other way that does not entirely cover your mouth and nose. Wash your hands before and after wearing the mask and use only the loops of the mask to put it on and take it off. Do not touch the front of the mask while wearing it. If you use a cloth mask, wash it and dry it daily and keep it in a clean, dry place.

COVID-19 vaccine

COVID-19 vaccines protect people from getting COVID-19. They are a vital tool to help stop the COVID-19 pandemic. The vaccine works with your body’s immune system against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19.While COVID-19 vaccines will not make you sick, they may cause certain side effects and flu-like symptoms. This is to be expected. These symptoms may be a sign that your body is making antibodies against the virus. Even after you receive both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine, you will still need to continue to wear a mask with at least 2 layers that fits snugly over your nose and mouth and is secured under your chin, stay at least 6 feet away from others, and wash your hands often.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention