• Press Release

Mount Sinai Researchers Provide the First Comprehensive and Prospective Characterization of a Genetic Subtype of Autism

First study to describe clinical presentation of Phelan-McDermid Syndrome will help guide future research and clinical care

  • New York, NY
  • (June 11, 2013)

In the first prospective study of its kind, Seaver Autism Center researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai provide new evidence of the severity of intellectual, motor, and speech impairments in a subtype of autism called Phelan-McDermid Syndrome (PMS). The data are published online in the June 11 issue of the journal Molecular Autism.

Mutation or deletion of a gene known as SHANK3 is one of the more common single-gene causes of autism spectrum disorders and is critical to the development of PMS, a  severe type of autism. To date, clinicians have relied on case studies and retrospective reviews of medical records to understand  the features of this disorder and how the clinical presentation relates to the extent of the genetic changes in the SHANK3 region. In the first systematic and comprehensive prospective trial, researchers led by Alex Kolevzon, MD, Clinical Director of the Seaver Autism Center, under the direction of Joseph Buxbaum, PhD, Director of the Seaver Autism Center, enrolled 32 participants with SHANK3 deletions to comprehensively assess their clinical symptoms and examine how the size of the SHANK3 deletion correlated to those symptoms.

“Previous studies have not utilized prospective assessments to understand Phelan-McDermid Syndrome, and the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has never been examined using gold-standard instruments” said Dr. Kolevzon. “There is no established standard for assessing  this type of autism, and our study provides important guidance in developing such a standard.”

Of the 32 patients enrolled, 84 percent met criteria for an autism spectrum disorder. Seventy-seven percent of patients exhibited severe to profound intellectual disability, with 19 percent using some form of verbal communication. Other common features included low muscle tone, gait disturbance, and seizures. The researchers also found that patients who had larger SHANK3 deletions had more severe disease.

“Our findings provide additional evidence of the significant impairment associated with SHANK3 deficiency,” said Dr. Kolevzon. “Also, knowing how large the deletion of the  SHANK3 gene is may have important implications for medical monitoring and individualizing treatment plans. Results also provide much-needed guidance in developing a standardized methodology for evaluating the features of this disorder.”

Many of the patients who participated in this study were next enrolled in a clinical trial at Mount Sinai evaluating Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), a commercially available compound for growth deficiency that is known to promote nerve cell survival as well as synaptic maturation and plasticity. The primary aim of the study is to target core features of PMS, including social withdrawal and language impairment, which will be measured using both behavioral and objective assessments. The clinical studies with IGF-1 were supported by studies in a genetically modified mouse with a mutation in SHANK3. These studies, carried out by Dr. Ozlem Bozdagi Gunal of the Seaver Autism Center, carefully examined brain function in the mice when SHANK3 was mutated, and provided preclinical evidence for a beneficial effect of IGF-1. These studies were reported the April 27 issue of Molecular Autism.

“The Seaver Autism Center has the unique capacity to evaluate autism spectrum disorders on both the molecular level and the clinical level,” said Dr. Buxbaum. “This capability puts us in a unique position to see the entire picture—the connection between genetics and behavior in these disorders—and to develop new treatments and better tailor existing ones for these children.”

To learn more about the Seaver Autism Center, visit http://icahn.mssm.edu/research/centers/seaver-autism-center.

About The Mount Sinai Medical Center
The Mount Sinai Medical Center encompasses both The Mount Sinai Hospital and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Established in 1968, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is one of the leading medical schools in the United States. The Icahn School of Medicine is noted for innovation in education, biomedical research, clinical care delivery, and local and global community service. It has more than 3,400 faculty members in 32 departments and 14 research institutes, and ranks among the top 20 medical schools both in National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding and by U.S. News & World Report.

The Mount Sinai Hospital, founded in 1852, is a 1,171-bed tertiary- and quaternary-care teaching facility and one of the nation’s oldest, largest and most-respected voluntary hospitals. In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked The Mount Sinai Hospital 14th on its elite Honor Roll of the nation’s top hospitals based on reputation, safety, and other patient-care factors. Mount Sinai is one of just 12 integrated academic medical centers whose medical school ranks among the top 20 in NIH funding and by U.S. News & World Report and whose hospital is on the U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll.  Nearly 60,000 people were treated at Mount Sinai as inpatients last year, and approximately 560,000 outpatient visits took place.

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About the Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai Health System is one of the largest academic medical systems in the New York metro area, with more than 43,000 employees working across eight hospitals, over 400 outpatient practices, nearly 300 labs, a school of nursing, and a leading school of medicine and graduate education. Mount Sinai advances health for all people, everywhere, by taking on the most complex health care challenges of our time — discovering and applying new scientific learning and knowledge; developing safer, more effective treatments; educating the next generation of medical leaders and innovators; and supporting local communities by delivering high-quality care to all who need it.

Through the integration of its hospitals, labs, and schools, Mount Sinai offers comprehensive health care solutions from birth through geriatrics, leveraging innovative approaches such as artificial intelligence and informatics while keeping patients’ medical and emotional needs at the center of all treatment. The Health System includes approximately 7,300 primary and specialty care physicians; 13 joint-venture outpatient surgery centers throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and more than 30 affiliated community health centers. We are consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report's Best Hospitals, receiving high "Honor Roll" status, and are highly ranked: No. 1 in Geriatrics and top 20 in Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Neurology/Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, Pulmonology/Lung Surgery, Rehabilitation, and Urology. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 12 in Ophthalmology. U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Children’s Hospitals” ranks Mount Sinai Kravis Children's Hospital among the country’s best in several pediatric specialties. The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is one of three medical schools that have earned distinction by multiple indicators: It is consistently ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report's "Best Medical Schools," aligned with a U.S. News & World Report "Honor Roll" Hospital, and top 20 in the nation for National Institutes of Health funding and top 5 in the nation for numerous basic and clinical research areas. Newsweek’s “The World’s Best Smart Hospitals” ranks The Mount Sinai Hospital as No. 1 in New York and in the top five globally, and Mount Sinai Morningside in the top 20 globally.

For more information, visit https://www.mountsinai.org or find Mount Sinai on FacebookTwitter and YouTube.