• Press Release

Early Human Species’ Teeth Provide Insight Into Evolution of Breastfeeding

  • New York, NY
  • (July 15, 2019)

Mount Sinai researchers working as part of an international team have discovered previously unknown breastfeeding patterns of an extinct early human species by studying their 2-million-year-old teeth, providing insights into the evolution of human breastfeeding practices, according to a study published in Nature in July.

Breastfeeding is a critical aspect of human development, and the duration of exclusive nursing and the timing of introducing solid food to the diet are also important determinants of health in human and other primate populations. Many aspects of nursing, however, remain poorly understood.

Using high-tech methods pioneered at Mount Sinai, the scientists analyzed teeth from Australopithecus africanus (A. africanus), an early human ancestor that lived about 2 to 3 million years ago in South Africa and had both human and apelike features. Scientists reconstructed diet histories using the teeth, measuring preserved chemical biomarkers. The growth patterns of teeth, which resemble tree rings, allow investigators to determine concentrations of barium, an element found in milk, in teeth over time, which yields information about their nursing and dietary patterns. Researchers found the species breastfed for up to one year and then had six monthly cycles of food scarcity, which could have caused them to fall back to increased breastfeeding or find other food sources.

“Seeing how breastfeeding has evolved over time can inform best practices for modern humans by bringing in evolutionary medicine. Our results show this species is a little closer to humans than the other great apes which have such different nursing behaviors,” said one of the study’s first authors, Christine Austin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and member of Mount Sinai’s Institute for Exposomic Research. “These are important findings from an evolutionary perspective, because humans have long childhoods and short breastfeeding periods while apes have longer breastfeeding periods than humans do. We’re still in the dark about why or when we made that change and what the effect of more recent major changes in breastfeeding, with agriculture and industrialization, could have on mothers’ and babies’ health.”

Mount Sinai’s Institute for Exposomic Research looks into how to develop biomarkers of exposure, and a prime one is measuring chemicals in teeth. Diet is a big part of the exposome—someone’s environmental exposure history—and nutritional stress is an exposure that is important to measure to understand overall health after exposures, Dr. Austin said.

“For the first time, we’ve gained new insight into the way our ancestors raised their young, and how mothers may have adapted to seasonal food shortages with breastfeeding,” said the study’s lead first author, Renaud Joannes-Boyau, PhD, head of the Geoarchaeology and Archaeometry Research Group (GARG) at Southern Cross University in Australia.

Dr. Joannes-Boyau conducted part of the experiments with Dr. Austin in 2017 while he was a visiting Associate Professor at Mount Sinai’s Institute for Exposomic Research. This study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R00HD087523) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (U2CES026561 and DP2ES025453).


About the Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai Health System is one of the largest academic medical systems in the New York metro area, with more than 43,000 employees working across eight hospitals, over 400 outpatient practices, nearly 300 labs, a school of nursing, and a leading school of medicine and graduate education. Mount Sinai advances health for all people, everywhere, by taking on the most complex health care challenges of our time — discovering and applying new scientific learning and knowledge; developing safer, more effective treatments; educating the next generation of medical leaders and innovators; and supporting local communities by delivering high-quality care to all who need it.

Through the integration of its hospitals, labs, and schools, Mount Sinai offers comprehensive health care solutions from birth through geriatrics, leveraging innovative approaches such as artificial intelligence and informatics while keeping patients’ medical and emotional needs at the center of all treatment. The Health System includes approximately 7,300 primary and specialty care physicians; 13 joint-venture outpatient surgery centers throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and more than 30 affiliated community health centers. We are consistently ranked by U.S. News & World Report's Best Hospitals, receiving high "Honor Roll" status, and are highly ranked: No. 1 in Geriatrics and top 20 in Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Neurology/Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, Pulmonology/Lung Surgery, Rehabilitation, and Urology. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 12 in Ophthalmology. U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Children’s Hospitals” ranks Mount Sinai Kravis Children's Hospital among the country’s best in several pediatric specialties. The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is one of three medical schools that have earned distinction by multiple indicators: It is consistently ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report's "Best Medical Schools," aligned with a U.S. News & World Report "Honor Roll" Hospital, and top 20 in the nation for National Institutes of Health funding and top 5 in the nation for numerous basic and clinical research areas. Newsweek’s “The World’s Best Smart Hospitals” ranks The Mount Sinai Hospital as No. 1 in New York and in the top five globally, and Mount Sinai Morningside in the top 20 globally.

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