• Press Release

National Institutes of Health Awards Mount Sinai Contract to Further Influenza Research

Award will support pandemic preparedness, advancing the understanding of flu biology.

  • New York
  • (April 10, 2014)

Seasonal influenza causes approximately 30,000 deaths yearly in the US, despite the availability of vaccines and antivirals. During pandemic years, these numbers can increase significantly. To insure pandemic preparedness, the National Institutes of Health has awarded $26 million to five institutions, including the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. The multimillion dollar award is part of an international collaboration of Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (CEIRS) network.

Adolfo García-Sastre, PhD, Director of the Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will serve as principal investigator for the Center for Research on Influenza Pathogenesis (CRIP), one of the five centers.

To head off flu pandemics, researchers at Mount Sinai will look at human exposure¬ airborne of direct contact transmission, and the transmission of the virus between animals and human. "We are thrilled to be part of an international collaboration that will collect samples from around the globe," said Dr.García-Sastre. "Researchers from the far corners of the world will send samples collected from animals with a swab and transport them to laboratories at Mount Sinai and other institutions." (A full list of institutions participating in the contract appears at the bottom of this release.)

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai team is set to conduct animal surveillance studies, including surveys of marine animals and wild birds in the Atlantic region. This information will shed light on virus evolution in animal reservoirs. Basic research will be performed at Mount Sinai's microbiology and genetics laboratories, as well as labs within this network. The focus of the research will include analyses of virus-host interactions, with the goal of determining why some influenza virus types cause more serious disease than others.

"What we hope to provide is basic understanding of the biology and transmission of novel influenza viruses so that the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may develop the best countermeasures when an outbreak occurs."

Dr. García-Sastre added, "We are grateful to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [part of the National Institutes of Health] for its generous support of this work. We hope that with new knowledge, better vaccines to prevent transmission may be developed."

Other members of the Center for Research on Influenza Pathogenesis, at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, include Peter Palese, PhD, Professor and Chairman of Microbiology, Megan Shaw PhD, Ana Fernandez-Sesma PhD, Nicole Bouvier MD, Harm van Bakel PhD, Florian Krammer PhD, Randy Albrecht PhD, and Melissa Uccellini PhD. CRIP collaborators also include investigators from the following institutions: University of Maryland; University of Wisconsin-Madison; MIT; University of California, Davis; University of Alaska, Anchorage; Erasmus Medical Center, The Netherlands; University of Cambridge, UK; Catholic University of Chile; and Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria, in Madrid, Spain.

The CEIRS Network will have a worldwide reach, with established or planned collaborations at more than two dozen sites in the United States, Asia, South America, Europe, and Australia.

The Mount Sinai team previously received a 2007 award from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. With that award, the team characterized the pandemic H1N1 virus of 2009.


About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is New York City's largest academic medical system, encompassing eight hospitals, a leading medical school, and a vast network of ambulatory practices throughout the greater New York region. Mount Sinai advances medicine and health through unrivaled education and translational research and discovery to deliver care that is the safest, highest-quality, most accessible and equitable, and the best value of any health system in the nation. The Health System includes approximately 7,300 primary and specialty care physicians; 13 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 415 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and more than 30 affiliated community health centers. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked on U.S. News & World Report's "Honor Roll" of the top 20 U.S. hospitals and is top in the nation by specialty: No. 1 in Geriatrics and top 20 in Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Neurology/Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, Pulmonology/Lung Surgery, Rehabilitation, and Urology. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 12 in Ophthalmology. Mount Sinai Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Children’s Hospitals” among the country’s best in four out of 10 pediatric specialties. The Icahn School of Medicine is one of three medical schools that have earned distinction by multiple indicators: ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report's "Best Medical Schools," aligned with a U.S. News & World Report "Honor Roll" Hospital, and No. 14 in the nation for National Institutes of Health funding. Newsweek’s “The World’s Best Smart Hospitals” ranks The Mount Sinai Hospital as No. 1 in New York and in the top five globally, and Mount Sinai Morningside in the top 20 globally.

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