Cancer - Oncology

Multiple Myeloma

The Multiple Myeloma program at Mount Sinai is the largest of its kind in New York City and one of the largest in the country. We are known throughout the world as a leader in multiple myeloma patient care and translational research. With a high patient volume, including more than 400 new patients each year, we have developed a uniquely focused program. Multiple myeloma is a complex cancer. It is best treated by physicians who see myeloma patients day in and day out and who have an in-depth understanding of myeloma biology.

Our mission is to provide comprehensive, compassionate care for patients with multiple myeloma and related diseases and advance innovative research and personalized treatments that lead to cure.

We provide novel, precision-medicine therapies that offer the best chance for good outcomes with a high quality of life. Our physicians are internationally recognized in the diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma at all stages, including Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undertermined Significance (MGUS) and Smoldering Myeloma, as well as related diseases such as Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, Castleman Disease, and Amyloidosis.

We offer the highest quality of care targeted to your disease for the best possible outcome. You will benefit from our innovative research in genomics, epigenetics, and immunotherapy, and our ability to quickly translate new findings into effective treatments.

Support Services

A diagnosis of myeloma can be overwhelming and create uncertainty for everyone involved. Our program supports patients and their loved ones with compassion and sensitivity to individual needs.

Our experienced social workers provide extensive cancer support services with a focus on a comprehensive patient care experience that addresses emotional, practical, and social needs. They offer supportive counseling services and access to resources and special programs in and outside the Mount Sinai healthcare system. Their wellness programs and educational materials are available to all cancer patients.

If you are admitted to the hospital, social workers will support you throughout your stay and will assist with planning your discharge and developing a plan for services that you might need when you return home.  They will coordinate services to ensure a smooth transition from inpatient care back to the outpatient setting.

Helpful information about coping with the many issues and concerns that accompany a diagnosis of cancer is available through the National Cancer Institute.