• Press Release

New Study Reports on the High Cost of Cardiac Surgery Healthcare Associated Infections

Findings reported at AHA Scientific Sessions 2013 reveal the economic impact of healthcare associated infections following cardiac surgery.

  • (November 17, 2013)

After cardiac surgery, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are common complications associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and use of resources.

Study findings reported at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2013 by investigators from the Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network (CTSN), whose Data and Clinical Coordinating Center is at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, revealed the substantial economic impact of HAIs following cardiac surgery and the importance of preventing these infections leading to re-hospitalizations.

In the new analysis, researchers examined data about the incremental costs associated with major HAIs within 65 days of cardiac surgery. Clinical data from 4,320 patients at nine academic medical centers was merged with related financial data routinely collected by the University Health Consortium in the United States. The most common cardiac surgery procedures undergone by these patients included valve surgery, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and CABG/valve surgery.

The data show during hospitalization, 2.7 percent of patients experienced major infections, such as pneumonia, sepsis, C. Difficile, and surgical site infections.

The average cost due to treating major HAI infection was calculated as about $40,000, with increased costs from Intensive Care Unit stays being an important contributing factor. Also, patients with major HAIs were nearly twice as likely to be readmitted as those with non-HAIs. In the patient population studied, there were 74 readmissions, with 8.7 percent due to HAIs.

"Our analysis found readmissions due to HAIs, after cardiac surgery cost on average nearly three times as much as non-HAI related readmissions," says Giampaolo Greco, PhD, Assistant Professor of Health Evidence and Policy at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

"We need to take action to avert preventable readmissions due to HAI infection rates after cardiac surgery, first for the patient's health and also to curb rising healthcare costs," says Dr. Greco.

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and Institute for Health Technology Studies (InHealth), a non-profit foundation.

As principal investigator for CTSN's Data and Clinical Coordinating Center based at Mount Sinai, Annetine C. Gelijns, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Evidence and Policy at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, previously received financial compensation as a consultant for InHealth's Research Council, which has supported some of the study-related analyses.

This study was presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2013 in Abstract Poster Session (18267): The Economic Impact of Healthcare Associated Infections in Cardiac Surgery.


About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is New York City's largest academic medical system, encompassing eight hospitals, a leading medical school, and a vast network of ambulatory practices throughout the greater New York region. Mount Sinai advances medicine and health through unrivaled education and translational research and discovery to deliver care that is the safest, highest-quality, most accessible and equitable, and the best value of any health system in the nation. The Health System includes approximately 7,300 primary and specialty care physicians; 13 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 415 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and more than 30 affiliated community health centers. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked on U.S. News & World Report's "Honor Roll" of the top 20 U.S. hospitals and is top in the nation by specialty: No. 1 in Geriatrics and top 20 in Cardiology/Heart Surgery, Diabetes/Endocrinology, Gastroenterology/GI Surgery, Neurology/Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, Pulmonology/Lung Surgery, Rehabilitation, and Urology. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked No. 12 in Ophthalmology. Mount Sinai Kravis Children's Hospital is ranked in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Children’s Hospitals” among the country’s best in four out of 10 pediatric specialties. The Icahn School of Medicine is one of three medical schools that have earned distinction by multiple indicators: ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News & World Report's "Best Medical Schools," aligned with a U.S. News & World Report "Honor Roll" Hospital, and No. 14 in the nation for National Institutes of Health funding. Newsweek’s “The World’s Best Smart Hospitals” ranks The Mount Sinai Hospital as No. 1 in New York and in the top five globally, and Mount Sinai Morningside in the top 20 globally.

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