Congenital Anomalies and Craniofacial Program

The Congenital Anomalies and Craniofacial Program is a respected resource for children and adults with congenital or acquired abnormalities, particularly those of the head, neck, and limbs. Patients are most often referred for genetic testing and diagnosis for multiple congenital anomalies or syndromes.

We are affiliated with the Mount Sinai Cleft and Craniofacial Program and the Kravis Children’s Hospital. Our program is one of the oldest in the country and the first of its kind in the New York metropolitan area. Our patients are seen and examined by
clinical geneticists with expertise in dymorphology and the care of patients with facial clefts, as well as complex craniofacial anomalies. Our goal is to develop a carefully coordinated treatment plan that minimizes the physical and psychological consequences of such anomalies, giving children access to a fuller, more satisfying life.

The Cleft and Craniofacial Program is certified by the American Cleft Palate Association (ACPA) and recognized by FACES: The National Craniofacial Association. We work closely with gynecologists, pediatricians, and perinatal specialists who care for children with cleft and craniofacial anomalies. Our cleft and craniofacial patients are seen by a team of specialists including: geneticists, pediatricians, speech therapists, dentists, otolaryngologists, plastic surgery, maxillofacial surgeons, neurosurgery, and ophthalmologists.

Common reasons for referral to a clinical geneticist:

  • Isolated cleft lip
  • Isolated cleft palate
  • Clefts of the lip and palate
  • Facial clefts
  • Craniosynostosis (sagittal, coronal, metopic, lambdoid)
  • Frontonasal dysplasia
  • Microtia
  • Branchial cleft cysts and sinuses
  • Jaw malocclusion
  • Pierre Robin sequence
  • Hemifacial microsomia
  • Goldenhar syndrome
  • Nager and Miller syndrome
  • Treacher-Collins syndrome
  • Apert syndrome
  • Crouzon syndrome
  • Pfeiffer syndrome
  • Saethre-Chotzen syndrome
  • Moebius syndrome
  • Oculodentodigital syndrome
  • Roberts syndrome
  • Syndactyly
  • Polydactyly