Hookworm infection

Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm

Hookworm infection is caused by roundworms. The disease affects the small intestine and lungs.

Hookworm - mouth of the organism

This photograph shows the front section of the hookworm, and the mouth parts which it uses to feed. The cutting plates, used to attach to the lining of the intestine where they suck blood for nourishment, are visible. Three species of hookworm cause infection in the United States, including this species, Necator americanus. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Hookworm - close-up of the organism

This is the mouth part of the hookworm Ancyclostoma duodenale. The hookworm uses sharp, curved cutting plates to attach to the lining of the intestine where it sucks blood for nourishment. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Hookworm - Ancylostoma caninum

This is a photograph of a hookworm on the lining of the intestine. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Hookworm egg

This is a hookworm egg. Hookworms hatch in damp vegetation. Their larvae can enter the human body through the skin, even without cuts or abrasions. Once through the skin, they begin the next step of their life cycle.

Hookworm rhabditiform larva

The larva of a hookworm is visible in the center of this photograph.

Digestive system organs

The digestive system organs in the abdominal cavity include the liver, gallbladder, stomach, small intestine and large intestine.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention