Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for COVID-19

If you have tested positive for COVID-19 and have symptoms, monoclonal antibody treatment may reduce your risk of getting sicker or needing to be in the hospital.

Depending on your age, medical history, and other factors, as well as how long you have had symptoms, you may benefit from treatment.

Monoclonal antibody treatments are not a substitute for COVID-19 vaccination, which remains the best way for you to protect yourself from complications of COVID-19. If you receive a monoclonal antibody treatment, COVID-19 vaccination will be delayed for 90 days after the treatment.

What are monoclonal antibodies?

Monoclonal antibodies are similar to the antibodies your body makes to fight infection and those that your body makes after getting a COVID-19 vaccine. These monoclonal antibodies are designed to decrease the amount of virus you have in your body.

Who can get monoclonal antibody treatment?

Monoclonal antibody treatment isn’t for everyone. The FDA has authorized use of monoclonal antibody treatment for patients who are at higher risk of getting very sick with COVID-19. Treatment may help those individuals age 12 and older who weigh 40 kg (88 pounds) or more and:

  • Have tested positive for COVID-19 in the last 10 days and have symptoms of COVID-19
  • Are at risk of developing serious disease or requiring admission to the hospital

If you are fully or partially vaccinated, you may still be eligible to receive monoclonal antibody treatment based on your age, medical history, and other factors that may place you at higher risk of having severe COVID-19 or requiring admission to the hospital for COVID-19.

These conditions may put you at higher risk for having severe COVID-19:

  • 65 years or older
  • Obesity or being overweight
  • Pregnant
  • Diabetes
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Immunosuppressive diseases or on immunosuppressive treatments
  • Heart or circulatory conditions such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, and high blood pressure
  • Chronic lung diseases like COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), moderate to severe asthma, interstitial lung disease, cystic fibrosis, and pulmonary hypertension
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders such as cerebral palsy or other conditions including genetic or metabolic diseases and congenital abnormalities
  • Having a medical device like a tracheostomy or gastrostomy

Other medical conditions or factors may put you at higher risk for getting very sick from COVID-19. If you have questions, please discuss with your health care provider or reach out for a referral.

Referral and treatment process

For monoclonal antibody treatment to be effective, you must begin it early. That means right after you develop symptoms and test positive for COVID-19.

Medical staff will screen you prior to offering monoclonal antibody treatment. You can be referred by your medical provider or self-refer by emailing covidtherapeuticreferrals@mountsinai.org or by calling 212-824-8390 to be referred to one of our New York City locations. If you reside in Long Island, Mount Sinai South Nassau also provides monoclonal antibody therapy, and referrals can be made by calling 516-632-4998 or by going to the Mount Sinai South Nassau emergency room.

Monoclonal antibody treatment is an intravenous therapy. Depending on the monoclonal antibody you receive, your visit may take two to three hours. After assessment and infusion you will be observed for an additional one hour after the infusion ends.

What if I was exposed and have no symptoms and tested negative for COVID-19? Do you offer post-exposure prophylaxis?

If you have recently had close contact with someone who has COVID-19, you may qualify for post-exposure prophylaxis even if you do not have symptoms and have not tested positive for COVID-19. Qualification is based on exposure history and your risk of progression to severe disease.

Exposure is described as being within six feet of an infected person for a total of 15 minutes within a 24-hour period.

People may qualify for post-exposure prophylaxis if they are not fully vaccinated or if they have been fully vaccinated but may not have an adequate immune response to the vaccine (for example, those with immunocompromising conditions or on immunosuppressive medications). Risk factors for progression to severe disease are the same as described above for symptomatic treatment.

If you are told you were exposed to COVID-19 and you are at risk for severe COVID-19 and have tested negative, the earlier you are offered prophylaxis, the better.

Medical staff will screen you prior to offering monoclonal antibody treatment. You can be referred by your medical provider or self-refer by emailing covidtherapeuticreferrals@mountsinai.org or by calling 212-824-8390 to be referred to one of our New York City locations. If you reside in Long Island, Mount Sinai South Nassau also provides monoclonal antibody therapy, and referrals can be made by calling 516-632-4998 or by going to the Mount Sinai South Nassau emergency room.

Monoclonal antibody treatment is an intravenous therapy. In some settings, post-exposure prophylaxis may be offered by injection instead of infusion. Depending on the monoclonal antibody you receive, your visit may take two to three hours. After assessment and the administration of the treatment you will be observed for an additional hour.