X-ray - skeleton

Skeletal survey

A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures, tumors, or conditions that cause wearing away (degeneration) of the bone.

X-ray

X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on film. Structures that are dense (such as bone) will appear white, air will be black, and other structures will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other diseases, especially when coupled with the use of barium and air contrast within the bowel.

Skeleton

The skeleton consists of groups of bones which protect and move the body.

Skeletal spine

The spine is divided into several sections. The cervical vertebrae make up the neck. The thoracic vertebrae comprise the chest section and have ribs attached. The lumbar vertebrae are the remaining vertebrae below the last thoracic bone and the top of the sacrum. The sacral vertebrae are caged within the bones of the pelvis, and the coccyx represents the terminal vertebrae or vestigial tail.

Hand X ray

An x-ray is a photo taken with a machine which passes electromagnetic radiation through the body, capturing an image of the internal structures.

Skeleton (posterior view)

The skeleton consists of groups of bones which protect and move the body.

The skeleton (lateral view)

The skeleton consists of groups of bones which protect and move the body.

How the Test is Performed

How to Prepare for the Test

How the Test will Feel

Why the Test is Performed

What Abnormal Results Mean

Risks