Rashes

Skin redness or inflammation; Skin lesion; Rubor; Skin rash; Erythema

Rashes involve changes in the color, feeling or texture of your skin.

Poison oak rash on the arm

Poison oak rash on the arm. Several plants produce toxins that cause skin reaction. This is the appearance of poison oak dermatitis. Note the typical linear streaks produced either by scratching or brushing against the plant. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Erythema toxicum on the foot

Newborn infants may have Erythema toxicum, a rash that is characterized by patchy redness with central vesicles. The rash is temporary, and the location may move (transient). (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Acrodermatitis

Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a skin condition peculiar to children that may be accompanied by mild symptoms of fever and malaise. It may also be associated with hepatitis B infection or other viral infections. The lesions appear as small coppery-red, flat-topped firm papules that appear in crops and sometime in long linear strings, often symmetric.

Roseola

Roseola is an acute disease of infants and young children that is characterized by high fever followed by a rash that appears on trunk, limbs, neck and face.

Shingles

Shingles, or herpes zoster, is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. The virus can lie dormant in the body for many years and re-emerge as shingles. Shingles appear as a painful rash. It consists of red patches of skin with small blisters (vesicles) that look very similar to early chickenpox. Shingles usually clears in 2 to 3 weeks and rarely recurs.

Cellulitis

Cellulitis is a deep infection of the skin, usually accompanied by generalized (systemic) symptoms such as fever and chills. The area of redness increases in size as the infection spreads. The center of the circled lesion has been biopsied.

Erythema annulare centrifugum - close-up

When redness appears in ring shapes on the body, it is referred to as erythema annulare, shown here on the forearm. There are generally no symptoms, with the exception of mild itching (pruritus). It may be associated with serious diseases, but in the majority of cases, an underlying illness is never discovered.

Psoriasis - guttate on the arms and chest

This is a picture of guttate (drop-shaped) psoriasis on the arms and chest. Guttate psoriasis is a rare form of psoriasis. It frequently follows a streptococcal infection, appears rapidly and affects the face, chest, and nearest limbs. The patches are small and round or oval and have the typical appearance of psoriasis. This photograph shows the diffuse and widespread coverage on the arm and chest.

Psoriasis - guttate on the cheek

This is a picture of guttate (drop-shaped) psoriasis on face and neck. Guttate psoriasis is a rare form of psoriasis. It frequently follows a streptococcal infection, appears rapidly and affects the face, chest, and nearest limbs. The patches are small and round or oval and have the typical appearance of psoriasis. This photograph shows the diffuse and widespread coverage on the face and neck.

Systemic lupus erythematosus rash on the face

This is a photo of a systemic lupus erythematosis rash on the face. Lupus erythematosis often produces a butterfly rash or malar rash. Typically, the rash also appears on the nose.

Poison ivy on the knee

This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the knee. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters (vesicles), often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The person may then spread the toxin to other areas of the body by scratching.

Poison ivy on the leg

This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the leg. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters, often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The rash is caused by skin contact with the oily sap (resin) of these plants. The oily resin usually enters the skin rapidly, and is seldom transferred from person to person. The rash is not caused by the fluid from the blisters. Thus, once the person has washed the oil off the skin, the rash is usually not contagious.

Erythema multiforme, circular lesions - hands

Erythema multiforme lesions are circular and may appear in concentric rings (often called target lesions). Target lesions may also be associated with other medical conditions such as herpes infection, streptococcal infection, tuberculosis (TB), or as a reaction to chemicals or medications.

Erythema multiforme, target lesions on the palm

Erythema multiforme lesions are often referred to as target lesions because of the concentric rings the lesions produce. The target appearance is well demonstrated in this photograph.

Erythema multiforme on the leg

The red spots on this person's back appear where blisters (bullae) caused by Erythema multiforme have ruptured and the overlying skin removed (denuded). The resulting lesions are yellow-crusted ulcers (erosions). Erythema multiforme may be associated with herpes simplex infection, mycoplasma pneumonia, or other medical conditions such as streptococcal infection, tuberculosis (TB), or may result from exposure to chemicals or medications.

Considerations

Causes

Home Care

When to Contact a Medical Professional

What to Expect at Your Office Visit