Sturge-Weber syndrome

Encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis; SWS

Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare disorder that is present at birth. A child with this condition will have a port-wine stain birthmark (usually on the face) and may have nervous system problems.

Sturge-Weber syndrome - soles of feet

This picture shows the soles of two feet involved with port wine stain. Port wine stains in the face may be seen in Sturge-Weber syndrome. Glaucoma, retinal detachment, calcification of the outer layers of the cerebral cortex, and seizures may also be seen.

Sturge-Weber syndrome - legs

Sturge-Weber syndrome is a disease that affects the skin and nervous system (neurocutaneous) and is associated with Port Wine Stain, red vascular markings on the face and other parts of the body (shown here on the legs). This is an unusual case, due to the large size of the lesion (extensive involvement). Occasionally seizures or learning disorders are also associated with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

Circulatory system

Blood used by the body is brought back to the heart and lungs by the veins of the body. Once the blood has gathered more oxygen from the lungs, it is pumped back out to the body through the arteries.

Port wine stain on a child's face

Port wine stains are always present at birth. In an infant, they are flat, pink, vascular lesions. Common locations include the face and neck, but they may be present anywhere on the body. Port wine stains may appear in association with other syndromes.

Deep veins

Veins in the extremities carry blood to the heart and lungs, where the blood is oxygenated. As the blood returns to the heart from the lungs, the arteries carry the oxygen-rich blood out to the body.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Support Groups

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention