Macular degeneration - age-related

Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD); AMD; Vision loss - AMD

Macular degeneration is an eye disorder that slowly destroys sharp, central vision. This makes it difficult to see fine details and read.

The disease is most common in people over age 60, which is why it is often called age-related macular degeneration (ARMD or AMD).

Macular degeneration

Macular degeneration is a disease of the retina that affects the macula in the back of the eye. The macula is important for clear cental vision, allowing an individual to see fine details. There are two types of macular degeneration, dry and wet. Dry macular degeneration is more common and is characterized by the thinning of the retina and drusen, small yellowish-white deposits that form within the retina. The dry form of macular degeneration is usually mild. Wet macular degeneration can happen more quickly and be more serious. It occurs when vessels under the retinal layer hemorrhage and cause the retinal cells to die creating blind spots or distorted vision in the central vision. The disease becomes increasingly common among people in each succeeding decade over 50.

Retina

The retina is the internal layer of the eye that receives and transmits focused images. The retina is normally red due to its rich blood supply.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Support Groups

Outlook (Prognosis)

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention