Deep vein thrombosis

DVT; Blood clot in the legs; Thromboembolism; Post-phlebitic syndrome; Post-thrombotic syndrome; Venous - DVT

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein deep inside a part of the body. It mainly affects the large veins in the lower leg and thigh, but can occur in other deep veins such as in the arms and pelvis.

Deep venous thrombosis, iliofemoral

This picture shows a red and swollen thigh and leg caused by a blood clot (thrombus) in the deep veins in the groin (iliofemoral veins) which prevents normal return of blood from the leg to the heart.

Deep veins

Veins in the extremities carry blood to the heart and lungs, where the blood is oxygenated. As the blood returns to the heart from the lungs, the arteries carry the oxygen-rich blood out to the body.

Venous blood clot

Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) affects mainly the veins in the lower leg and the thigh. It involves the formation of a clot (thrombus) in the larger veins of the area.

Deep veins

Veins in the extremities carry blood to the heart and lungs, where the blood is oxygenated. As the blood returns to the heart from the lungs, the arteries carry the oxygen-rich blood out to the body.

Venous thrombosis - series - Normal anatomy

Veins carry blood back to the heart from the tissues. Blood flowing in the veins is under lower pressure and moves more slowly than blood flowing in the arteries. Blood is therefore more likely to clot in the veins, thus blocking the flow through the veins.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention