Vesicles

Blisters

A vesicle is a small fluid-filled blister on the skin.

Bullous pemphigoid, close-up of tense blisters

Pemphigus is classified as one of the blistering diseases. These is a close-up picture of typical lesions. Very small blisters are called vesicles. Larger blisters, like these, are called bullae.

Chigger bite - close-up of blisters

Chigger bites are caused by the larvae of the chigger. The bite produces blisters (vesicles) and bleeding into the skin (purpura). These bites itch intensely and are usually located on exposed areas of the skin where the chigger larvae have access. This photograph demonstrates vesicle formation following the bites.

Hand, foot, and mouth disease on the soles

Hand, foot, and mouth disease is cause by a coxsackie virus. It produces mouth ulcers and small blisters (vesicles) on the hands and feet. The vesicles often have a reddish border with a white or lighter colored area in the center.

Herpes simplex - close-up

This close-up view of an early herpes outbreak shows small, grouped blisters and a lot of redness.

Herpes zoster (shingles) - close-up of lesion

A close-up picture of herpes zoster skin lesions. Four small blisters are shown with redness around them. These vesicles will break, crust over, scab, and finally heal.

Poison ivy on the knee

This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the knee. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters (vesicles), often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The person may then spread the toxin to other areas of the body by scratching.

Poison ivy on the leg

This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the leg. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters, often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The rash is caused by skin contact with the oily sap (resin) of these plants. The oily resin usually enters the skin rapidly, and is seldom transferred from person to person. The rash is not caused by the fluid from the blisters. Thus, once the person has washed the oil off the skin, the rash is usually not contagious.

Vesicles

A vesicle, or blister, is a thin-walled sac filled with a fluid, usually clear and small. Vesicle is an important term used to describe the appearance of many rashes that typically consist of or begin with tiny-to-small fluid-filled blisters.

Considerations

Causes

Home Care

When to Contact a Medical Professional

What to Expect at Your Office Visit