Spine Research Day

Sheeraz A. Qureshi, MD, and Michael G. Neuwirth, MD, hosted the first annual Mount Sinai Spine Research Day in the Hess Auditorium on May 16, 2013. The meeting highlighted the extensive clinical and basic science research program cultivated by Mount Sinai's orthopaedic spine group. K. Daniel Riew, MD, Chief of the Cervical Spine Center at Washington University in St Louis was the visiting professor, lecturing on "complication avoidance and management in cervical spine surgery."

Andrew C. Hecht, MD, Chief of Spine Service at Mount Sinai, was noted as saying, "Today's event recognizes all of our ongoing research in basic science, health policy, and clinical care for spine surgery. Our Director of Spine Research James C. Iatridis, PhD, and his wonderful team of post docs and students, as well as the spine surgical team and residents, have crafted a state-of-the-art program today reflecting the full spectrum of spine surgical research in disc biology, health policy and clinical care with an emphasis on translational projects. It also serves as a reunion for the previous fellows. Our fellowship directors, Dr. Qureshi and Dr. Neuwirth have also devised a wonderful program for today."

Dr. Iatridis, Professor and Director of Spine Research at Mount Sinai noted, "This event highlights the tireless efforts of our faculty, trainees, and staff to build a world class research program over the last few years. It's been a privilege for me to work with such a talented team, and we have been having a great time putting our creative energy together to improve spine healthcare."

The creative energy of the Mount Sinai Orthopaedic Spine Team was evident as studies from basic science, health policy and the clinical program were presented to more than 70 enthusiastic faculty members, staff, and returning fellows. The research projects presented demonstrates the strength of Mount Sinai as a spine center, complete with cutting edge research influencing practice in spine care.

The basic science research included work on a new large animal model for disc degeneration, as well as minimally invasive strategies for the repair of the annulus fibrosis after microdiscectomy that are being done at Mount Sinai. The clinical sessions included presentations on defining value in cervical spine surgery, as well as comparative effectiveness of different treatments strategies for cervical disorders.

Sessions were extremely well-receive d, adding to the Mount Sinai Orthopaedic Spine Service's national and international reputation as a leader in clinical care and in translational research in spine care.

For more information, visit our Orthopaedics Research Laboratory website.