Breast lump removal

Lumpectomy; Wide local excision; Breast conservation surgery; Breast-sparing surgery; Partial mastectomy

Breast lump removal is surgery to remove a lump that may be breast cancer. Tissue around the lump is also removed. This surgery is called a lumpectomy.

When a noncancerous tumor such as a fibroadenoma of the breast is removed, it is often called an excisional breast biopsy, instead of a lumpectomy.

Female Breast

The female breast is either of two mammary glands (organs of milk secretion) on the chest.

Needle biopsy of the breast

A needle biopsy is performed under local anesthesia. Simple aspirations are performed with a small gauge needle to attempt to draw fluid from lumps that are thought to be cysts. Fine needle biopsy uses a larger needle to make multiple passes through a lump, drawing out tissue and fluid. Withdrawn fluid and tissue is further evaluated to determine if there are cancerous cells present.

Open biopsy of the breast

An open biopsy can be performed under local or general anesthesia and will leave a small scar. Prior to surgery, a radiologist often first marks the lump with a wire, making it easier for the surgeon to find.

Breast self-exam

Monthly breast self-exams should always include: visual inspection (with and without a mirror) to note any changes in contour or texture; and manual inspection in standing and reclining positions to note any unusual lumps or thicknesses.

Breast self-exam

Monthly breast self-exams should always include: visual inspection (with and without a mirror) to note any changes in contour or texture; and manual inspection in standing and reclining positions to note any unusual lumps or thicknesses.

Breast self-exam

Monthly breast self-exams should always include: visual inspection (with and without a mirror) to note any changes in contour or texture; and manual inspection in standing and reclining positions to note any unusual lumps or thicknesses.

Breast lumps

Less than one-fourth of all breast lumps are found to be cancerous, but benign breast disease can be difficult to distinguish from cancer. Consequently, all breast lumps should be checked by a health care professional.

Lumpectomy

Lumpectomy is a surgical procedure performed on a solid breast mass to determine if it is malignant. The suspicious lump and some surrounding tissue is excised and analyzed.

Causes of breast lumps

Most breast lumps are benign (non-cancerous), as in fibroadenoma, a condition that mostly affects women under age 30. Fibrocystic breast changes occur in more than 60% of all women. Fibrocystic breast cysts change in size with the menstrual cycle, whereas a lump from fibroadenoma does not. While most breast lumps are benign, it is important to identify those that are not. See your health care provider if a lump is new, persistent, growing, hard, immobile, or causing skin deformities.

Breast lump removal - series

The female breast is composed mainly of fatty tissue interspersed with fibrous or connective tissue. The circular region around the nipple is often a different color or pigmented. This region is called the areola.

Description

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Risks

Before the Procedure

After the Procedure

Outlook (Prognosis)