Burns

First degree burn; Second degree burn; Third degree burn

Burns commonly occur by direct or indirect contact with heat, electric current, radiation, or chemical agents. Burns can lead to cell death.

Burn, blister - close-up

First degree burns produce only reddening of the skin. Second degree burns produce blistering, as seen here.

Burn, thermal - close-up

Mild, or first degree burns cause only reddening of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin), as seen in this photograph. Second degree burns cause blistering and extend into the dermis (lower layer of skin). Third degree burns cause tissue death through the dermis and affect underlying tissues.

Airway burn

Burns to the airway can be caused by inhaling smoke, steam, superheated air, or toxic fumes, often in a poorly ventilated space. Airway burns can be very serious since the rapid swelling of burned tissue in the airway can quickly block the flow of air to the lungs.

Skin

The skin is the largest organ of the body. The skin and its derivatives (hair, nails, sweat and oil glands) make up the integumentary system. One of the main functions of the skin is protection. It protects the body from external factors such as bacteria, chemicals, and temperature.

First degree burn

First degree burns affect the outer layer of the skin, causing pain, redness, and swelling.

Second degree burn

Second-degree burns affect both the outer and underlying layer of the skin, causing pain, redness, swelling, and blistering.

Third degree burn

Third-degree burns extend into deeper tissues, causing brown or blackened skin that may be numb.

Minor burn - first aid - series

To treat a minor burn, run cool water over the area of the burn or soak it in a cool water bath (not ice water). Keep the area submerged for at least 5 minutes.

Considerations

Causes

Symptoms

First Aid

Do Not

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention