Ventriculoperitoneal shunting

Shunt - ventriculoperitoneal; VP shunt; Shunt revision

Ventriculoperitoneal shunting is surgery to treat excess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain (hydrocephalus).

Ventricles of the brain

The ventricles of the brain are hollow chambers filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which supports the tissues of the brain.

Craniotomy for cerebral shunt

During a cerebral shunt procedure a flap is cut in the scalp and a small hole is drilled in the skull. A small catheter is passed into a ventricle of the brain. A pump (valve which controls flow of fluid) is attached to the catheter to keep the fluid away from the brain. The accumulation of excess fluid around the brain can cause an increase in intracranial pressure. The excess pressure can cause a decrease in blood flow to the brain leading to brain damage.

Ventriculoperitoneal shunt - series

The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) bathes the brain and spinal cord. Most of the CSF is in the ventricles of the brain, which are large cavities within the brain which produce and reabsorb the CSF.

Description

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Risks

Before the Procedure

After the Procedure

Outlook (Prognosis)