Transient ischemic attack

Mini stroke; TIA; Little stroke; Cerebrovascular disease - TIA; Carotid artery - TIA

A transient ischemic attack occurs when blood flow to a part of the brain stops for a brief time. A person will have stroke-like symptoms for up to 24 hours. In most cases, the symptoms last for 1 to 2 hours.

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is felt to be a warning sign that a true stroke may happen in the future if something is not done to prevent it.

Endarterectomy

Endarterectomy is a surgical procedure removing plaque material from the lining of an artery.

Transient Ischemic attack (TIA)

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) is caused by a temporary state of reduced blood flow in a portion of the brain. This is most frequently caused by tiny blood clots that temporarily occlude a portion of the brain. A primary blood supply to the brain is through two arteries in the neck (the carotid arteries) that branch off within the brain to multiple arteries that supply specific areas of the brain. During a TIA, the temporary disturbance of blood supply to an area of the brain results in a sudden, brief decrease in brain function.

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Symptoms

Exams and Tests

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Outlook (Prognosis)

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention