Tinea versicolor

Pityriasis versicolor

Tinea versicolor is a long-term (chronic) fungal infection of the skin.

Tinea versicolor - close-up

Tinea versicolor is a superficial fungal infection common in adolescent and young adult males. This close-up view demonstrates the typical pattern of the rash.

Tinea versicolor - shoulders

Tinea versicolor is a superficial fungal infection common in adolescent and young adult males. Frequent sites of infection include the neck, upper chest, and axilla (arm pit). The rash may range from yellow to golden brown in color. Mild itching is also associated with this infection. This photograph demonstrates fairly extensive involvement.

Tinea versicolor - close-up

This is a fungal infection of the skin known as tinea versicolor, and is common in adolescent and young adult males. Besides the rash, there may be mild itching. Frequent sites of infection include the neck, upper chest, and arm pit (axilla). The rash may be white to yellowish to golden brown in color. A tan can accentuate the difference in skin color.

Tinea versicolor on the back

Tinea versicolor is an infection caused by a fungus that is common in adolescent and young adult males. Besides the rash, seen here on the back, there may be mild itching. Frequent sites of infection include the neck, upper chest, and arm pit (axilla). The rash may be white (as seen here) to yellowish to golden brown in color. A tan can accentuate the difference in skin color.

Tinea versicolor - back

Tinea versicolor is caused by the organism Pityrosporum ovale. It occurs most often in young adults. Wood's lamp examination revelas pale yellow-green fluorescence. KOH prep reveals "spaghetti and meatballs" with hyphae and spores. Skin lesions are sharply marginated macules, either hyper or hypopigmented, covered with fine scale. Small discrete lesions may eventually coalesce to cover large areas of the trunk.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention