Systemic lupus erythematosus

Disseminated lupus erythematosus; SLE; Lupus; Lupus erythematosus; Butterfly rash - SLE; Discoid lupus

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease. In this disease, the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and other organs.

Systemic lupus erythematosus

Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder which may affect many organ systems including the skin, joints and internal organs. The disease may be mild or severe and life-threatening. African-Americans and Asians are disproportionately affected.

Lupus, discoid  - view of lesions on the chest

Lupus, discoid - view of lesions on the chest: This close-up picture of the neck clearly shows the typical rounded appearance of discoid lupus. The whitish appearance is caused by scaling. The two dark spots are biopsy sites and are not part of the disease.

Lupus, discoid on a child's face

The round or disk shaped (discoid) rash of lupus produces red, raised patches with scales. The pores (hair follicles) may be plugged. Scarring often occurs in older lesions. The majority (approximately 90%) of individuals with discoid lupus have only skin involvement as compared to more generalized involvement in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE).

Systemic lupus erythematosus rash on the face

This is a picture of a systemic lupus erythematosis rash on the face. Lupus erythematosis often produces a "butterfly rash" or malar rash. Typically, the rash also appears on the nose.

Antibodies

Antigens are large molecules (usually proteins) on the surface of cells, viruses, fungi, bacteria, and some non-living substances such as toxins, chemicals, drugs, and foreign particles. The immune system recognizes antigens and produces antibodies that destroy substances containing antigens.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Support Groups

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional