Aneurysm in the brain

Aneurysm - cerebral; Cerebral aneurysm; Aneurysm - intracranial

An aneurysm is a weak area in the wall of a blood vessel that causes the blood vessel to bulge or balloon out. When an aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel of the brain, it is called a cerebral, or intracranial, aneurysm.

Cerebral aneurysm

An aneurysm is a sac-like protrusion of an artery caused by a weakened area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the worst headache of my life."

Cerebral aneurysm

Weakness, numbness, or other loss of nerve function may indicate that an aneurysm may be causing pressure on adjacent brain tissue. Symptoms such as a severe headache, nausea, vomiting, vision changes or other neurological changes can indicate the aneurysm has ruptured and is bleeding into the brain. A ruptured intracranial aneurysm causes intracranial bleeding and is considered very dangerous.

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Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention