Global Women's Health

If you were a woman living in Liberia, odds are you wouldn't live beyond the age of 41. Mount Sinai is helping to change this. Economically disadvantaged communities throughout the world are deeply affected by the health-related consequences of poverty and few of the more than 16,000 students who earn medical degrees in the U.S. each year have been trained to address the health needs of these most vulnerable populations.

Mount Sinai Global Women's Health programs combine resident education with real world charitable care in order to establish sustainable programs, improve access and availability of services, reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, and educate and train providers around the world to deliver quality women's health care. In short, we're preparing our physicians to be good global citizens, and we are building programs internationally to facilitate this goal.

Global Health Partners Advancing Care for Women

In Monrovia, Liberia, for instance, where the female mortality rate is 180 out of 1,000 live births and where there are only six obstetrician gynecologists in the entire country, we have partnered with other Mount Sinai departments, as well as other U.S. academic medical centers to send teams of physicians to a tertiary care hospital to provide critical training to local healthcare providers to help change these odds.

In the foothills of Santiago, Guatemala, we have partnered with a small community hospital to provide clinical care and birthing kits to the rural community. And in El Salvador, a country with the highest incidence of cervical cancer in Latin America, our physicians provide training for local healthcare providers to diagnose and treat early cervical cancer.

In Cartagena Colombia, major gaps in care exist because of lack updated equipment and training in the use of available equipment. Through philanthropic funding from “Fundaciόn Vida Raquel K. Gilinski”, ultrasound and electronic fetal monitoring units were purchased.  Global Women’s Health has been conducting workshops for technicians, obstretrical nurses and, physicians in the utilization of this equipment with the goal to improve maternal and fetal outcomes in Cartagena.  

Leadership

Ann Marie Beddoe, MD
Assistant Professor, OBstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Science
Director of Global Women's Health
Mount Sinai Health System

Michael Brodman, MD
Professor and Ellen and Howard C. Katz Chair of
Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciene
Mount Sinai Health System

Division Members

Omara Afzal, DO
Charles Ascher-Walsh, MD
Linus Chuang, MD
Molly Lieber, MSW, MPH
Rachel Masch, MD
Lise Rehwaldt, MD


Global Health

Read about our Global Health work in Guatemala. [PDF]