CEHC Announces New Fellows in Pediatric Environmental Health

In this interdisciplinary post-doctoral research training program, fellows obtain classroom education, mentored research experience, and clinical experience at our Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit - PEHSU.

New York, NY
 – July 14, 2010 /Press Release/  –– 

Each year, the Mount Sinai Fellowship in Environmental Pediatrics provides advanced training to a select group of pediatricians and doctorally trained scientists. In this interdisciplinary post-doctoral research training program, fellows obtain classroom education, mentored research experience, and clinical experience at our Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU). At the end of this three-year program, fellows receive an MPH degree from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, in addition to valuable research experience in environmental pediatrics. 

This year, CEHC is proud to welcome four new fellows:

Andrea Deierlein, PhD is an epidemiologist who received her PhD in nutrition epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in May 2010.  Her dissertation was titled “The effects of maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on offspring anthropometric outcomes.” Dr. Deierlein obtained an MPH in epidemiology from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in 2006, and an MS degree in human nutrition from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University in 2004.  She received her undergraduate degree from Cornell University in 2001 with a major in animal science.  In her fellowship, Dr. Deierlein is interested in examining the effects of prenatal and early life exposures to nutrition and environmental toxins on the development of obesity and related conditions.

Kevin Chatham-Stephens, MD is a board-certified pediatrician who received his undergraduate degree from the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill in 2000 and his MD degree from UNC in 2005.  After completing a residency in pediatrics at Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) from 2005-2008, he served as a Pediatric Chief Resident at OHSU from 2008-2009.  Prior to coming to Mount Sinai, he worked as a hospitalist and general pediatrician in Portland, Oregon.  His major research interest focuses on understanding the synergistic roles of exercise, diet and the built environment as risk factors for childhood obesity.

Andrea Wershof Schwartz, MD graduated with Distinction in Research from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 2010, where she received the Harold Elster prize for Highest Academic Standing and the George James Epidemiology Award. She is an MPH candidate at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where her thesis topic is “Socio-demographic Barriers to Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccinations among Elderly Israelis.” She earned her undergraduate degrees from Columbia University and the Jewish Theological Seminary, where she also earned an MA in 2004. During her fellowship, which will be of one-year duration, Dr. Wershof Schwartz will work with CEHC’s Dr. Leonardo Trasande in developing mathematical projections of the future course of the obesity epidemic in American children and its associated economic costs.

Mana Mann, MD, MPH is a fully trained, board-eligible pediatrician.  She obtained her undergraduate degree from Columbia University in 2000, with a major in chemistry.  She received her MD degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 2007.  She also received a MPH degree from the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in 2007.  Her MPH thesis research, which was undertaken in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Mount Sinai, explored the effects of phthalates on the development of children in East Harlem, New York City.  She was the recipient of a Macy Scholarship from Columbia University to support this work.  From 2007 to the present, Dr. Mann has served as a resident in pediatrics at Mount Sinai, and she is expected to complete her residency in June 2010. In her fellowship, Dr. Mann is interested in continuing to explore the developmental consequences of exposures in early life to phthalates and other potentially endocrine-disrupting compounds.