Frequently Asked Questions

What number do I call to make appointments?
212-241-4242 between the hours of 8am - 5pm, Monday - Friday.

What number do I call to make a same day appointment for my sick child?
212-241-4242 between the hours of 8am - 4:30pm, Monday - Friday.

*It is ideal if you call before 12pm.

My child is sick but I would like to speak to a doctor first before making a same day sick appointment. What do I do?
Please note that if your child is sick, it is best to schedule an urgent appointment instead of waiting to speak to the doctor first as they may not call you back until after the office is closed.

What number do I call to reach the on-call physician to speak to them about an URGENT or EMERGENCY issue?
212-241-4242 after 5pm on weeknights and on weekends and holidays.

*If your child is having an emergency, please call 911 first and then us.

What if I arrive late for my appointment?
Patients are requested to arrive within 15 minutes of their scheduled appointment time after that, they are considered a “No Show” and the doctor may not be able to accommodate you at all or until after all the other patients have been seen.

What immunization schedule does your practice follow? 
We adhere to the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP) immunization schedule.
Visit the CDC ACIP website

We firmly believe that fully vaccinating your child is one of the most important things we do.

My child has a fever - what Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and/or Ibuprofen (Advil/Motrin) do I give them?
If your child is less than 2 months old and has a fever (temperature of 100.4°F or higher), please seek medical attention immediately. A fever in an infant less than 2 months old can be a sign of serious infection.

If your child has a fever and is unwell, has difficulty breathing, is lethargic, the fever lasts for more than 3 days, or other concerns - please call the office and speak to a doctor.

Learn more about Medicine Dosing for Fever or Pain Relief [PDF]

I think my baby is constipated. What should I do?
In babies (less than 1 year of age), constipation is not defined by how often the child has a bowel movement but the consistency of the bowel movement. In the first year of life, the consistency and color of the BM will change (yellow, green, brown – all normal!) however they should be soft. Babies that are constipated often have “hard pebbles” of stool.

In children of all ages, including infants, a sorbitol containing juice (such as prune juice) can be helpful for constipation. Dilute 1/2 ounce of prune juice with 1/2 ounce of water (or breastmilk/formula) and feed to your baby up to two times per day. Please call us if you aren't seeing improvement in a few days.

In children older than 4-6 months of age who have started solids, dietary changes can be helpful. Increasing water intake, removing rice (especially rice cereal) from the diet, giving your child pureed prunes/prune juice, and increasing intake of other high fiber foods can help.

If your child seems to be in pain, is vomiting, if you notice in blood in the stool, or other concerns – please call the office and speak to a doctor.

My baby has been very gassy and fussy. What should I do?
In babies less than 8-12 weeks of age, gassiness and fussiness are very common.

Some babies develop “colic” which is defined as extreme fussiness characterized by inconsolable crying for at least 3 hours per day 3 times per week. Many babies with colic will have their crying spells in the evenings but these can occur at any time during the day or night and/or multiple times during the day. Symptoms of colic usually peak at 6 weeks of life and then improve dramatically after that.

For both gassiness and colic, soothing techniques can work in helping to calm your child. The 5 “S’s” of soothing include:

  1. Swaddling – Placing your baby in a nice tight (but not too tight!) swaddle can make them feel secure. Even if they wiggle their way out, the first few minutes they stay in can be comforting for them.
  2. Swaying –Try rocking up and down if side to side is not working – it mimics the motion of your body when you were walking and baby was inside of you. Placing the baby in a bouncy seat or swing can also be very helpful and give your arms a rest.
  3. Sucking – Sucking is very comforting for babies – you can use your finger or a pacifier.
  4. Shushing – Shushing loudly close to the baby’s face or using other white noise can help a baby to calm down.
  5. Side Position - Placing your baby on their left side can help ease gas pain and/or fussiness. Remember to never place your baby on their stomachs while they are sleeping to avoid the increased risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome).

If your child has vomiting, arching of the back, is feeding poorly, has blood in the stool, or other concerns – please call the office and speak to a doctor.

My child has a cold (runny nose, congestion, cough, fevers) but seems to be eating ok and has a good activity level. What can I do?

The common cold (also known as an upper respiratory infection) is very common in children of all ages and most of the time is caused by a virus for which there is no medication (ie antibiotics) that can be used. Symptoms usually include a combination of runny nose, congestion, cough, and fever. Fever in viral illnesses can range from 100.4 – 104°F or higher.

If your child is acting well, most upper respiratory infections can be handled at home. We recommend supportive care which includes the following:

  • Encouraging lots of fluid intake. While your child may not feel like eating, it is important to ensure they stay hydrated. If they refuse their milk/formula, you can try Pedialyte which is available in your local grocery store/pharmacy. Your child should urinate at least 3 times in a 24 hour period, a sign of adequate hydration.
  • Treat fevers with Tylenol (older than 2 months) and/or Motrin (older than 6 months)
  • Steam up your bathroom - run the shower in your bathroom with hot water and let your bathroom steam up. Sit in the bathroom with your child for 10-15 minutes and let them breathe in the steam.
  • Use nasal saline drops and suction out your child’s nose.
  • Use a cool mist humidifier in your child’s room.

If your child is less than 2 months old and has a fever (temperature of 100.4°F or higher), please seek medical attention immediately. A fever in an infant less than 2 months old can be a sign of serious infection.

If your child is having any difficulty breathing (breathing very hard or very fast), is in pain, is not acting well or the fever persists for longer than 3 days - please call the office and speak to a doctor.

My child had a cold which got better but has a cough that is persisting. What can I do?

It is very common for a cough to persist after a cold (or upper respiratory infection) gets better.

Cough can be especially worse at night and disturb a child’s sleep.

We do not recommend any of the over the counter cough medications as many of them have not been tested in children and have side effects. If your child is otherwise well and acting normal, some remedies you can try include:

  • Honey: (do not give honey to a child less than 1 year old) Honey is a wonderful natural home remedy. Buckwheat (dark) honey is the best. Give your child a teaspoonful a few times per day – especially right before bedtime.
  • Steam up your bathroom - run the shower in your bathroom with hot water and let your bathroom steam up. Sit in the bathroom with your child for 10-15 minutes and let them breathe in the steam.
  • Motrin/Tylenol: Coughing can be painful for some children causing both throat and muscle/rib pain. A dose of Motrin or Tylenol can be helpful. If you find your child is requiring these medications for more than 2 days in a row - please call the office and speak to a doctor.

If your child is having any difficulty breathing (breathing very hard or very fast), has a history of asthma, the cough has lasted greater than 4 weeks, or other concerns, please call the office and speak to a doctor.

Here is a list of websites you may find helpful which contain parent/patient information on common General Pediatric issues or concerns:

Please note that the material presented is for informational purposes only, and should not be used as a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a health care professional.

Contact Us

To make an appointment or for more information:
Tel: 212-241-4242
Fax: 212-360-6714

Mount Sinai General Pediatrics Faculty Practice
5 East 98th Street, 10th Floor
New York, NY 10029

Hours of Operation:
Phone lines open at 8am daily

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 6pm
Weekends/Holidays Urgent visits only - times determined by doctor on call

Doctor on-call for urgent issues on weeknights after 5pm, weekends, and holidays available at: 212-241-4242

For billing questions, please call:
Tel. 212-987-3100

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