Vasectomy

Sterilization surgery - male; No-scalpel vasectomy; NSV; Family planning - vasectomy; Contraception - vasectomy

A vasectomy is surgery to cut the vas deferens. These are the tubes that carry a sperm from testicles to the urethra. After a vasectomy, sperm cannot move out of the testes. A man who has had a successful vasectomy cannot make a woman pregnant.

Before and after vasectomy

Vasectomy is a simple procedure that is very effective in preventing pregnancy. Men usually have no side effects from vasectomy, and no change in sexual performance or function. Some men will feel sore for a few days, but pain can be relieved by analgesics and an ice pack.

Sperm

The male reproductive system creates sperm that is manufactured in the seminiferous tubules within each testicle. The head of the sperm contains the DNA, which when combined with the eggs DNA, will create a new individual. The tip of the sperm head is the portion called the acrosome, which enables the sperm to penetrate the egg. The midpiece contains the mitochondria which supplies the energy the tail needs to move. The tail moves with whip-like movements back and forth to propel the sperm towards the egg. The sperm have to reach the uterus and the fallopian tube in order to fertilize a womans egg.

Vasectomy - series

The vas deferens are thin muscular tubes that carry sperm from each testicle to the urethra.

Description

Why the Procedure is Performed

Risks

Before the Procedure

After the Procedure

Outlook (Prognosis)