Warts

Plane juvenile warts; Periungual warts; Subungual warts; Plantar warts; Verruca; Verrucae planae juveniles; Filiform warts; Verruca vulgaris

Warts are small, usually painless growths on the skin. Most of the time they are harmless. They are caused by a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV). Some types of warts are spread through sex.

Certain warts have an increased risk of cancer. Your health care provider can discuss this with you.

Warts may affect your appearance and can be embarrassing. Warts may itch or hurt (especially when they are on the feet).

Warts, multiple - on hands

Warts are a very common skin condition. They frequently appear as single lesions or in small groups. This is a photograph of an unusually severe and extensive case of warts. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

Warts, flat on the cheek and neck

Warts may occur on any area of the body. These are typical looking warts on the face.

Subungual wart

Subungual warts appear under and around the fingernails. These warts are similar to the common wart but are much more difficult to cure than warts found elsewhere on the body.

Plantar wart

Plantar warts are found on the soles of the feet. Because of their location, they can become extremely painful. Large numbers of plantar warts on the foot may cause difficulty when running and even walking.

Wart

Warts are small, usually painless growths on the skin caused by a virus. The typical wart is a raised round or oval growth on the skin with a rough surface. Common warts tend to cause no discomfort unless they are in areas of repeated friction or pressure. Warts often go away on their own within two years.

Wart (verruca) with a cutaneous horn on the toe

This person has a wart (verruca) that has built up a cutaneous horn which is made up of hard keratin. This does not slough-off like normal skin cells.

Wart (close-up)

A common wart. A circular bandage.

Wart removal

A wart is a benign skin growth caused by a virus. They may occur anywhere on the body but are frequently seen on the hands, feet, and face (areas of frequent contact). Over-the-counter medications are often effective in removal of warts.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention