Urinary tract infection - adults

Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults

A urinary tract infection, or UTI, is an infection of the urinary tract. The infection can occur at different points in the urinary tract, including:

  • Bladder. An infection in the bladder is also called cystitis or a bladder infection.
  • Kidneys. An infection of one or both kidneys is called pyelonephritis or a kidney infection.
  • Ureters. The tubes that take urine from each kidney to the bladder are rarely the only site of infection.
  • Urethra. An infection of the tube that empties urine from the bladder to the outside is called urethritis.
Bladder catheterization, female

A catheter (a hollow tube, often with an inflatable balloon tip) may be inserted into the urinary bladder when there is a urinary obstruction, following surgical procedures to the urethra, in unconscious patients (due to surgical anesthesia, coma, etc.), or for any other problem in which the bladder needs to be kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured.

Bladder catheterization, male

Catheterization is accomplished by inserting a catheter (a hollow tube, often with and inflatable balloon tip) into the urinary bladder. This procedure is performed for urinary obstruction, following surgical procedures to the urethra, in unconscious patients (due to surgical anesthesia, coma, etc.), or for any other problem in which the bladder needs to be kept empty (decompressed) and urinary flow assured. Catheterization in males is slightly more difficult and uncomfortable than in females because of the longer urethra.

Female urinary tract

The female and male urinary tracts are relatively the same except for the length of the urethra.

Male urinary tract

The male and female urinary tracts are relatively the same except for the length of the urethra.

Prevention of cystitis

Appropriate hygiene and cleanliness of the genital area may help reduce the chances of introducing bacteria through the urethra. Females are especially vulnerable to this, because the urethra is in close proximity to the rectum. The genitals should be cleaned and wiped from front to back to reduce the chance of dragging E. coli bacteria from the rectal area to the urethra.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention