Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is a disease in which inflammation occurs in the lymph nodes, lungs, liver, eyes, skin, or other tissues.

Sarcoid, stage I - chest X-ray

Sarcoid is primarily a lung (pulmonary) disease. In the early stages, a chest film may show enlargement of lymph nodes in the center of the chest near the heart (mediastinum).

Sarcoid, stage II - chest X-ray

Sarcoid causes damage to the lung tissue that heals by scarring. The film shows a diffuse milky and granular appearance in the normally dark lung areas. This individual has marked decrease in lung function.

Sarcoid, stage IV - chest X-ray

This film shows advanced sarcoid, scarring of the lungs (the light streaking), and cavity formation (the dark areas in the upper right side of the picture).

Sarcoid - close-up of the skin lesions

Sarcoid - close-up of the skin lesions: 20 to 25 percent of individuals with sarcoidosis have skin manifestations as seen in this picture. The extent of the skin manifestations is difficult to predict, but the most common are red papules that are translucent as seen here.

Erythema nodosum associated with sarcoidosis

This picture shows reddish-purple, hard (indurated), painful nodules (Erythema nodosum) that occur most commonly on the shins. These lesions may be anywhere on the body and may be associated with tuberculosis (TB), sarcoidosis, coccidioidomycosis, systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE), fungal infections, or in response to medications.

Sarcoidosis - close-up

Typical sarcoid lesions consist of red, raised lesions (papules) and patches (plaques) with minimal surrounding skin change.

Sarcoidosis on the elbow

These lesions of sarcoidosis are located on the elbow and are red, elevated patches (plaques). The cause of sarcoidosis remains unknown.

Sarcoidosis on the nose and forehead

These are sarcoid lesions on the face. These lesions often appear in scars, as is seen in this photograph.

Respiratory system

Air is breathed in through the nasal passageways, travels through the trachea and bronchi to the lungs.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional