Molluscum contagiosum

Molluscum contagiosum is a viral skin infection that causes raised, pearl-like papules or nodules on the skin.

Molluscum contagiosum - close-up

Molluscum is a viral infection which generally goes away by itself (is self-limited). The lesions are typically raised, firm, flesh-colored bumps (papules) with a pearly or smooth shiny appearance.

Molluscum contagiosum - close-up of the chest

Molluscum is a benign infection which is generally self-limited. The lesions are typically raised, firm, flesh-colored bumps (papules) with a pearly or smooth shiny appearance. These are classical appearing Molluscum. The large lesion in the center is one that has been picked and scratched and shows evidence of low-grade inflammation.

Molluscum on the chest

These lesions are associated with the molluscum virus and are present on a person who has a weakened immune system (immunocompromised). Molluscum contagiosum are small, raised, pearly skin lesions caused by the molluscum virus, a member of the poxvirus family. They are seen frequently in children and less often in adults. In adults, they may be considered a sexually transmitted disease. Immunocompromised individuals may experience heavy outbreaks of these lesions, as seen in this photograph.

Molluscum, microscopic appearance

This is how a molluscum lesion appears under microscopic examination. Molluscum are small, raised, pearly skin lesions caused by the molluscum virus, a member of the poxvirus family.

Molluscum contagiosum on the face

Molluscum contagiosum is most commonly seen in children, however it does occur in adults and may cause extensive infection in people with weakened immune systems. In this photograph, multiple small molluscum are seen covering the cheek, upper neck, and in the sideburn.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Prevention