Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy - hypertrophic (HCM); IHSS; Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis; Asymmetric septal hypertrophy; ASH; HOCM; Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a condition in which the heart muscle becomes thick. Often, only 1 part of the heart is thicker than the other parts.

The thickening can make it harder for blood to leave the heart, forcing the heart to work harder to pump blood. It also can make it harder for the heart to relax and fill with blood.

Heart, section through the middle

The interior of the heart is composed of valves, chambers, and associated vessels.

Heart, front view

The external structures of the heart include the ventricles, atria, arteries and veins. Arteries carry blood away from the heart while veins carry blood into the heart. The vessels colored blue indicate the transport of blood with relatively low content of oxygen and high content of carbon dioxide. The vessels colored red indicate the transport of blood with relatively high content of oxygen and low content of carbon dioxide.

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the thickening of the muscles that make up the heart. The thickening may interfere with the normal functioning of the heart by narrowing the outflow of the ventricle; reducing the ability of the heart to relax and fill with blood during the relaxation phase; or reducing the ability of the valves of the heart to function properly. Any situation that increases the contraction or rate of contraction of the heart muscle can worsen these symptoms.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

When to Contact a Medical Professional