Acne

Acne vulgaris; Cystic acne; Pimples; Zits

Acne is a skin condition that causes pimples or "zits." Whiteheads, blackheads, and red, inflamed patches of skin (such as cysts) may develop.

Baby acne

Baby acne is usually seen on the cheeks, chin, and forehead. It can be present at birth but usually develops around 3 to 4 weeks of age. Baby acne occurs when hormonal changes in the body stimulate oil glands in the babys skin. The condition can look worse when the baby is crying or fussy, or any other instance that increases blood flow to the skin. Baby acne is harmless and usually resolves on its own within several weeks.

Acne - close-up of pustular lesions

Acne lesions frequently contain pus. This close-up photograph shows small acne pustules with surrounding inflammation (erythema).

Blackheads (comedones)

Blackheads, or open comedones, are common in acne. Clogged hair follicles reflect light irregularly to produce this black hue.

Acne, cystic on the chest

Cystic acne may occur across the upper chest as well as on the back.

Acne, cystic on the face

The face is the most common location of acne. Here, there are 4 to 6 millimeter red (erythematous) pustules, some with bridging scars and fistulous tract formation (connecting passages). Severe acne may have a profound psychological impact and may cause scarring. Effective treatments are available for this type of acne.

Acne, vulgaris on the back

Acne frequently occurs on the back. Here, there are 2 to 6 millimeter wide erythematous (red) pustules with large open and closed comedones. Permanent scarring may follow a severe case of acne. Men are more often affected on their shoulders and back than are women.

Acne on the back

Acne affects the areas of the skin that contain sebaceous glands, including the face, upper chest, and back. Acne occurs most commonly during adolescence. Many new treatment regimens are available for acne, especially for the most severe types.

Acne

Acne is a skin condition that causes whiteheads, blackheads, and inflamed red lesions to form. These growths are commonly called pimples or "zits." Three out of four teenagers have acne to some extent.

Causes

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

Outlook (Prognosis)

When to Contact a Medical Professional