Can Multimedia Lead to More Informed Decisions on Prostate Cancer Treatment?

Mount Sinai School of Medicine leads a study on whether multimedia materials help prostate cancer patients make treatment decisions.

New York. NY
 – March 11, 2010 /Press Release/  –– 

Mount Sinai School of Medicine is leading a study of patients newly-diagnosed with prostate cancer to determine if providing them with multimedia materials can help them make more informed treatment decisions. Michael Diefenbach, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Urology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine developed a multimedia software program designed to help prostate cancer patients and their families make treatment decisions. The Cancer Information Service Research Consortium (CISRC) is supporting the study by providing the software to a group of patients in the study to learn if having a multimedia resource helps them determine their treatment pathway.

A diagnosis of prostate cancer can be overwhelming, and having to choose which treatment option is best for the patient is even more challenging. There are numerous options available with positive long-term treatment outcomes and patients typically desire therapy that will have the least impact on their quality of life.

"Having a discussion about treatment options is difficult for a patient who is still absorbing the shock of their diagnosis," says Dr. Diefenbach. “We hope that providing this multimedia software will help patients and their families be fully engaged in their treatment discussions and make an informed decision with their doctor.”

The multimedia program includes interviews with leading prostate cancer experts and survivors, a discussion of the available treatment options, and a virtual notebook so patients can keep track of which elements of treatment are important to them.

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provided funding for the CISRC study. Dr. Diefenbach’s team hopes to recruit 800 participants. Patients will be divided into two groups and each group will receive a packet of information regarding their diagnosis. One group will receive the free, multimedia program created by Dr. Diefenbach and printed material, and the other will receive printed material only.

"This study is designed to empower patients to take charge of their diagnosis and find the most suitable option for themselves,” continued Dr. Diefenbach. "Not only can the multimedia program help patients and their family members who enroll, their participation will help those who are diagnosed in the future."

Patients interested in participating should call toll-free (866) 258-7981 to learn more. Patients will be interviewed briefly before receiving further information. A follow-up interview will take place several months later. Those not qualifying for the study will be directed to other resources to help them with their questions. To be eligible to participate, the patient must have a recent diagnosis of prostate cancer and not have chosen any treatment

About The Mount Sinai Medical Center
The Mount Sinai Medical Center encompasses The Mount Sinai Hospital and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The Mount Sinai Hospital is one of the nation’s oldest, largest and most-respected voluntary hospitals. Founded in 1852, Mount Sinai today is a 1,171-bed tertiary-care teaching facility that is internationally acclaimed for excellence in clinical care. Last year, nearly 60,000 people were treated at Mount Sinai as inpatients, and there were nearly 450,000 outpatient visits to the Medical Center.

Mount Sinai School of Medicine is internationally recognized as a leader in groundbreaking clinical and basic science research, as well as having an innovative approach to medical education. With a faculty of more than 3,400 in 38 clinical and basic science departments and centers, Mount Sinai ranks among the top 20 medical schools in receipt of National Institute of Health (NIH) grants. For more information, please visit www.mountsinai.org.

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